The Latest

nezua:

I stayed on my own path and did not follow the herd. I made a way for myself.

-Eartha Kitt
Feb 15, 2014 / 50 notes

nezua:

I stayed on my own path and did not follow the herd. I made a way for myself.

-Eartha Kitt

(via arathesane)

Morehouse College, founded in 1867 in Atlanta Georgia.  Wishing our brothers a happy Founders Day, with love and appreciation. (source: Auburn Avenue Research Library)
Feb 15, 2014 / 24 notes

Morehouse College, founded in 1867 in Atlanta Georgia.  Wishing our brothers a happy Founders Day, with love and appreciation. (source: Auburn Avenue Research Library)

Let me introduce you to the most evil word in the English language: ‘Just.’ Stick it near the beginning of some advice, and you can turn someone else’s vicious lifelong struggle into a trivial task they should feel ashamed for not having mastered by now.
Feb 14, 2014 / 5,559 notes
erikkwakkel:

Page in bloom
A herbary is a book on plants. I always thought that such books contained drawings or paintings of plants. Until I came across this object on the website of the Bodleian Library in Oxford. Constructed around 1595, it is likely the oldest of its kind from England. The book is filled with about 300 real plants, which were gathered in Italy by a monk called Gregorio Reggio. Short descriptions accompany the specimens, which look like they were picked yesterday. Every page forever in bloom.
Pic: Bodleian Library. More on herbaries with real plants here.
Feb 14, 2014 / 792 notes

erikkwakkel:

Page in bloom

A herbary is a book on plants. I always thought that such books contained drawings or paintings of plants. Until I came across this object on the website of the Bodleian Library in Oxford. Constructed around 1595, it is likely the oldest of its kind from England. The book is filled with about 300 real plants, which were gathered in Italy by a monk called Gregorio Reggio. Short descriptions accompany the specimens, which look like they were picked yesterday. Every page forever in bloom.

Pic: Bodleian Library. More on herbaries with real plants here.

(via uispeccoll)

nmaahc:

Married, but separated on different plantations William and Ellen Craft devised a plan to escape the horrors of slavery.Ellen, who was very fair-skinned, passed as a young white man. Her husband William played her doting servant.They set out on December 21, 1848 and traveled luxuriously by train and ferry. During a four-day trip they were almost thwarted, but quick wits and good old-fashioned luck kept them on their way. After arriving in the free city of Philadelphia they were given a crash course in reading and writing. After a short stay, they moved to Boston ere William resumed work as a cabinetmaker and Ellen became a seamstress. Two year later slave catchers showed up, but they quickly fled to England to avoid their captors. They remained in Europe for over 20 years and had five children. In 1860, the couple wrote “Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom,” chronicling the escape. The Craft’s returned to the United States in the 1870s and established a school for newly freed African Americans.Learn more about their story in Smithsonian Magazine. 
Feb 13, 2014 / 4,234 notes

nmaahc:

Married, but separated on different plantations William and Ellen Craft devised a plan to escape the horrors of slavery.

Ellen, who was very fair-skinned, passed as a young white man. Her husband William played her doting servant.They set out on December 21, 1848 and traveled luxuriously by train and ferry. During a four-day trip they were almost thwarted, but quick wits and good old-fashioned luck kept them on their way. After arriving in the free city of Philadelphia they were given a crash course in reading and writing. After a short stay, they moved to Boston ere William resumed work as a cabinetmaker and Ellen became a seamstress. Two year later slave catchers showed up, but they quickly fled to England to avoid their captors. They remained in Europe for over 20 years and had five children. 

In 1860, the couple wrote “Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom,” chronicling the escape. The Craft’s returned to the United States in the 1870s and established a school for newly freed African Americans.

Learn more about their story in Smithsonian Magazine

(via reads4pleasure)

Feb 13, 2014 / 5 notes
Feb 12, 2014 / 50 notes

reads4pleasure:

algonquinbooks:

Celebrate Black History Month with some truly classic Algonquin books, from Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie to Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons and many other Lucky Stars e-books in February.

Just bought The Good Negress and Silver Rights for $ 1.99 each.  Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is only $ 3.99.  If you’ve been meaning to check out her writing, Purple Hibiscus is the perfect book to start.

why is it always the woman who has to see past the beast in the man? why does she always have to clean his wounds, even after he has damaged her beyond repair? why is it always the man who is worthy of forgiveness for being a monster?
I want to see the beast in the beauty.
the half smile, half snarl. the unapologetic anger. I would like to see the man forgive the monster. to see her, blood and all, and love her anyway.
beauty and the beast | Caitlyn S. (via yasodhara)

Happy Valentine’s Day.

(via bad-dominicana)

Feb 12, 2014 / 58,795 notes
pbsamericanmasters:

Alice Walker will be our next subject, set your DVR for Friday, February 7 at 9 p.m. on PBS. 
Jan 26, 2014 / 100 notes

pbsamericanmasters:

Alice Walker will be our next subject, set your DVR for Friday, February 7 at 9 p.m. on PBS

I read [my books] sometimes to cheer me up when it is hard to write and then I remember that it was always difficult and how nearly impossible it was sometimes.
Jan 16, 2014 / 1,418 notes